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No Shortage Of Social Media Non Believers

So there I was, minding my own business… poring over my extensive collection of Yanni ablums when a good friend of mine sends me an email with a link to a story.

And not just any article, no this was a piece about a product, which seemingly had achieved enormous success – to the tune of $1 billion in sales, without lifting one social media finger.

The product is Febreeze, the delightfully smelling air-freshener from Proctor & Gamble and the article was penned by Jonathan Salem Baskin. In his piece, which Mr. Baskin whimsically titled The iPad of Air-Care, he compares Febreeze to Apple…  No Shortage Of Social Media Non Believers

“Febreze introduced 37 new products or variations in the first nine months of 2010, choosing to let them “do the talking” for the brand much as Apple lets its less-frequent introductions do the same.”

Wow, sounds great, doesn’t it? Mr. Baskin further states his case by telling readers that “Febreze isn’t creating entertaining “content” for its consumers to enjoy on YouTube, or allowing them to share on its Facebook site their personal stories about overcoming odor problems (I can’t find an official-looking FB page for the brand).” And that he “couldn’t find a single customer complaint it fixed on Twitter.”

Wow again… Who needs social media?

Upon Further Review…

Wait… hang on.

“Febreze isn’t creating entertaining “content” for its consumers to enjoy on YouTube?”

You mean like this?

No Shortage Of Social Media Non Believers

And Febreeze doesn’t allow them (consumers) to share on its Facebook site their personal stories about overcoming odor problems and you couldn’t even find an official Facebook page, right?

Hmmm… then I’m not quite sure what these are…

And you also stated that you “couldn’t find a single customer complaint it fixed on Twitter” right?

Well there you may have something because I too could not find any “customer complaint [Febreeze] fixed on Twitter.” Not that I spent a whole helluva lot time looking mind you but it surely didn’t take me to long to find:
The YouTube Channel
The Facebook Page

And it sure didn’t take me very long to find this…

What this is, in case you didn’t know Mr. Bskin, is a screen shot taken from search.twitter.com. And as you can plainly see, people are in fact discussing the virtues of Febreeze.

The Consumer Is In Control…

And that’s precisely what social media non-believers like Mr. Baskin and Bob Hoffman, AKA The Ad Contrarian, don’t get. Advertisers, companies & agencies don’t control what is being said via social media.

The consumer does!

Even if there were no Febreeze Facebook Page or You Tube channel, people would still be talking about it online…

No Shortage Of Social Media Non Believers

Why? Because they can!

I don’t know Mr. Baskin from Baskin Robbins and I’m sure he’s a very nice man, and I very much enjoy reading The Ad Contrarian but… what these two gentlemen, and many like them unfortunately, do not seem to grasp nor understand is…

Social media is here to stay; deal with it.
Consumers control the conversation.
Social media was NEVER meant to be a replacement nor substitute for quote/unquote traditional advertising and marketing! It was meant to support it; work in unison with it; be one part of an overall strategy.
And if you still doubt the power of social media and its influence, consider the case of Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta. A billion views on her You Tube channel later, 30 million likes on her Facebook Page later, and now “The Queen of Twitter” … you know her better as Lady Gaga.

Here’s the bottom line…
Mr. Baskin nailed it when he wrote: “Selling products that people want to buy.”
That’s it right there… Without a viable product that people want to buy, it doesn’t matter which medium/platform you use.

Camping in National Parks

The United States has hundreds of National Parks, founded to preserve some of the country’s most beautiful and pristine spots while allowing any visitor to enjoy their natural beauty.

Of the hundreds of National Parks, more than 100 allow camping. Camping in National Parks is a great way to see America, have a few adventures and save money in the process.

History

The first publicly protected park, transferred to California State ownership in 1864, was the Yosemite Valley. The first National Park was Yellowstone, established in 1872. The National Park Service was created in 1916 to manage and protect the growing number of National Parks throughout the nation.

Access and Amenities

Campsite amenities vary: some have hot showers, campfire rings and laundry facilities, while others may not even offer water. “Developed” campsites can generally be reached by car and offer more amenities, including RV hookups. “Primitive” campsites are usually private and scenic but often can be reached only on foot.

Cost and Reservations

Most National Park campsites are available on a first-come, first-serve basis (so arrive early on holiday weekends). A few campgrounds accept reservations. Campsites usually cost $10-$20 a night.

Wildlife and Fire Dangers

When you enter the park or the campground, you’re likely to see signs or meet a Ranger who will warn you about any park dangers. These vary from park to park: in Yosemite, you may be told to store your food in “bear boxes”; in Indiana, you might hear about a firewood quarantine for pest control. Fire danger varies by area as well. Follow all instructions to the letter; National Parks are the property of all U.S. citizens, and it’s every visitor’s responsibility to keep them beautiful and safe.

Time Limit

Enjoy your stay, but don’t linger: the maximum stay in a National Park is 14 days.

Review of Hotel Regno in Rome

Review of Hotel Regno in RomeHotel Regno in Rome is a 6-story romantic get-away located near the Fontana Di Trevi where many lovers have tossed in a coin or two in hopes of making their love last forever. The hotel offers cozy, comfortable accommodations in the heart of Piazza Di Spagna, an exclusive shopping district in the historic city. Hotel Regno was a government library in the 16th century and has been serving as a hotel since 1933. The hotel is close to public transportation. The official website for the hotel runs summer specials as well as Internet specials for those who make their reservations online.

Insider Tips

Rome’s public transportation allows quick access to the city and all its temptations. Italian cuisine, gold jewelry and romantic, historical landmarks are just some of what awaits you. Visit the Spanish Steps and the famous shopping Review of Hotel Regno in Romearea Via Del Corso. The hotel offers a cozy terrace lounge decorated with original antique furniture and evokes an elegant upscale feel. Breakfast is served in the breakfast room or on the terrace daily from 7:30-10 a.m. Breakfast is a traditional Italian buffet of fresh baked breads, croissants, jams and honey, fresh fruit, local cheeses, coffee, cappuccino and juices.

Pros and Cons

Hotel Regno is close to many of Rome’s most visited attractions such as the Coliseum, Vatican City and the Forum. The rooms are small and offer cable and satellite TV, mini bar and safe. The hotel offers concierge service, room service, babysitting services and currency exchange. High speed Internet packages are available at an additional charge. The rooftop terrace overlooks the city where you can relax and eat breakfast or just enjoy the sun. Although the hotel does not serve lunch or dinner, you won’t have trouble locating a place nearby to dine. Visitors to the city have their choice of restaurants. If Italian is not your first choice, many other choices are available.

Review of Hotel Regno in RomeBottom Line

Hotel Regno is a moderately priced hotel yet offers sophisticated and charming accommodations. The rooms and lobby have an upscale elegance. Upon arrival, guests are greeted with a complimentary bottle of sparkling wine. The hotel’s unmatched service and friendly 24-hour staff is what separates it from the others. Hotel Regno is just minutes away from famous landmarks, which makes it an ideal location for travelers who want to explore Rome and Italy’s ancient ruins. Visit the hotel’s website for Internet deals. The site also has a calendar of events for the city to help travelers decide when to visit Rome.

Brand Managers Who Want More Loyal Customers Need To Do This

Every brand manager and product manager in the world wants more loyal customers, right? Well if they can master the art of one-simple 6-letter word they would be well on their way to achieving their goals.

This seemingly innocuous or harmless word can be very harmful and quite damaging to a brand’s long term success if not done properly and consistently.

The word is “engage” or “engagement” if you prefer. No matter what you call it interacting and engaging with your customers and prospects is the key to establishing, fostering and maintaining brand loyalty. However as know from a recent post, Engagement Is The Most Important Digital Challenge For Marketers… “According to a recent McKinsey quarterly report, having the ability to engage their customers and leverage those relationships is the number one digitally-related challenge facing marketers today.”

Brand Manager 1

In its findings from a recent report, the Top 12 Customer Loyalty Trends for 2012 – Loyalty 360, the loyalty marketer’s association made it perfectly clear that brand managers and product managers and all digital marketers better meet that challenge head on.

“Customer engagement is the journey, loyalty is the destination. Loyalty is a much bigger, broader, richer and growing ever more complex idea than it has been in the past. Loyalty is no longer about points, discounts, miles, rewards; it is about the way the processes, technologies, ideas, interactions engage an individual with the brand. The only way to achieve loyalty is through deeper engagement.”

That last line is very powerful indeed if for no other reason the use of the word “only.”

Brand Manager 1

More from their report:

  • Marketers are being distracted by daily deal sites and need to refocus and get their eyes on the ultimate prize. “While daily deals like Group-on, Living-social are generating lots of buzz, marketers are realizing that these price-based technologies have taken their focus away from the real prize: customer loyalty.”
  • The issue of Big Data is all-too real and knowing how to use it effectively. “Study after study is showing that marketers are struggling with mining this data and analyzing it in order to derive valuable insights and actionable intelligence from it.”
  • Marketers will seek out brand ambassadors. “Social personalization will increase. Marketers will harness the power of recommendations and referrals to persuade customers and prospects to follow their friends’ leads. They will become more proactive in encouraging reviews, implementing refer-a-friend programs, etc.”

Loyal Customers

These are just some of the loyalty trends Loyalty 360 identified and you can read the full report here.

It is clear, now more than ever, that engaging your customers and your prospects in a deep and meaningful way is paramount to any company’s success. Consumers want to engage their favorite brands, they want to know you are listening, they want dialogue, two-way conversations.

How do engage your customers now?

What other ways can you engage them?

As a consumer, which we all are at the end of the day, how do you want your favorite brands to engage with you?

Has Black Friday Become Thoughtless Thursday?

Has Black Friday Become Thoughtless Thursday? Major brands – from Walmart to Kmart to Sears to Old Navy, to name but a few, will be open for business on Thanksgiving night. As if that’s not bad enough, one major department store is running a commercial which features someone stealing something out of another person’s shopping cart.

Look, I get it… I really do. I’m in advertising and marketing and have been for over 20 years, so I know all about the need to move merchandise/make money, and if people are willing to shop, far be it for a retailer to not oblige them. If a retailer wants to open its doors on Thanksgiving night, so be it.

But have we reached a point where nothing is sacred anymore? Is there any day that is off limits when it comes to consumers spending money in a bricks and mortar location? Obviously in today’s digital world, consumers can go online and shop anytime they damn well want to. However, they cannot of course get the instantaneous satisfaction of handing over their money and receiving a physical item in exchange. If you order online, you must then wait. And when it comes to the holidays and shopping, some of us don’t exactly have an over abundance of patience.

Sure we will do plenty of shopping online this holiday season but give us a chance to get in our cars and drive to a mall and spend the next X number of hours fighting through crowds as we listen to piped in holiday music… hell yeah, many of us will jump at the chance.

But does that make it right?

Like I said earlier, I understand it from the retailers’ perspective but Thanksgiving night? Really? What, opening at 3AM on Black Friday – or even earlier, wasn’t good enough?

Has Black Friday Become Thoughtless Thursday?Maybe I’m feeling this way because I used to work in retail (supermarket) many moons ago. So I know of the plight of the retail worker when it comes to the holidays and drawing the short straw and having to work while others are at home with their families.

Or maybe it’s because I’m an emotional guy who thinks everyone deserves at least one day they can spend with their family and friends; where no one needs to man a register or stock a shelf.

Are those days over for good?

It just seems like the whole Black Friday phenomenon is now rolling into one continuous shop-a-palooza with a brief respite being provided on Thanksgiving itself to allow for consumers and workers alike a few hours to stop and eat, watch a little football and then right back to battleground.

And someone has to help me with this one… Yesterday I saw a commercial for Sears promoting their “Day After Thanksgiving Sale” which they pointed out was happening on Friday, AKA the day after Thanksgiving. Now are we collectively that devoid of logic that we needed a reminder that the “Day After Thanksgiving Sale” was indeed happening… the day after Thanksgiving. Or, did Sears and their ad agency feel the need to inform us that this was NOT a Thanksgiving Day Sale but rather a “Day After Thanksgiving Sale?” You know, just so there was no confusion…

Has Black Friday Become Thoughtless Thursday?Black Friday Pilfering..
As for the aforementioned major department store and the ad they’re currently running which features out and out theft… watch it for yourself.

Did you see it? Go back and look what the woman does at the :14 mark…

So not only does this commercial feature one of the worst jingles in history, in my humble opinion, but out and out puts stealing front and center.

Oh sure, the spot is intended – at least I assume it is – to be evoke warm holiday feelings. But to show someone literally taking something from someone else, on Black Friday of all days when tensions run exceedingly high, just makes no sense to me.

What do you think the reaction will be if someone tries this on Black Friday?

Customer #1: Hey, you just took something right out of my cart!

Customer #2: It’s ok, that’s how they do it at Kohl’s! Happy Thanksgiving!

Customer #1: Oh no you didn’t…

Cue the store security, police, etc…

What were they thinking showing this in their commercial?

Someone please help me understand… Anyone. Bueller?